Cooking Suggestions

Cooking Suggestions

Here are cooking tips and a few of our favorite recipes to get you started.
We would also be glad to hear about any of your best tips and recipes!

General Post Roast Suggestions

Braising Slowly
• Cook it at a low temperature for a while.
• Use a braising liquid to keep things moist.
• Any combination of beer or wine, broth or stock, or even just water works well.
• You can add other things to the mix if you’d like, like apple juice or even cola.

Which vegetables to include in a pot roast?
• Pot roasts often include vegetables. These veggies will end up really soft and tender. If you want them less soft, you can add them halfway through the cooking time.
• Root vegetables like carrots, potatoes and onions are common and the best bet. You want something that stands up to the long cooking time.

How to Make a Perfect Pot Roast

Step #1
• Season a beef pot roast all over with a liberal amount of salt and pepper
• For a 2.5 pound chuck roast, you’ll want to use about a teaspoon of salt and half a teaspoon of black pepper.
• Heat a skillet over medium-high heat
• Add a tablespoon of olive oil
• Let the oil get really hot then add the roast to the hot oil
• Cook on one side until very well-browned
      • You want it crusty because that brown caramelized crust is going to add tons of flavor to the eventual dish
      • It’s take 4-5 minutes. Then flip it over and get the other side brown and crusty as well.

Step #2
      • While the roast sears in the skillet, peel your carrots and chop them into large chunks so that they don’t cook to quickly. Similarly, halve small potatoes and quarter larger ones

Step #3
• Preheat oven to 300°F.
• Transfer the roast to a roomy roasting pan
      • You need space for the roast to be surrounded by potatoes
• Pour beef stock into the skillet, about 2 cups
• You’re going to want the liquid to go halfway up the roast in the roasting pan so the amount really depends on the size of your roast and the size of your roasting pan
• Heat the stock to a simmer
• Add 1/2 tablespoon of balsamic vinegar for each cup of stock
• Stir
• Pour over the roasts in the roasting pan
• Surround roast with potatoes.

Step #4
• Top the roast and potatoes with the carrots
      • They keep their color and flavor better that way
      • Adding them on top is the best bet.

Step #5
• Put a lid on the roasting pan, or cover it tightly in heavy-duty foil if you don’t have a lid
• Put it into the oven until the potatoes and carrots are soft and the meat is tender enough that you could pull it apart with your fingers, about 2 hours time
• Remove the meat and potatoes from the liquid
• Optionally drizzle the meat with some balsamic vinegar (1 teaspoon per roast) or serve it on the side as a dip
• Slice the meat and serve with the potatoes, carrots, balsamic vinegar and braising liquid (optional).

• You can also make use of the liquid in the roasting pan
• Skim off the fat and serve the juices on the side or turn it into a gravy by mixing together water and cornstarch and then adding it to the skimmed juices
• Start with 1/4 cup water and 2 tablespoons of corn starch, add it and then bring it to a simmer to thicken it. Add more cornstarch and water mixture if you’d like it thicker.

Ingredients:
• 1 (2.5 lb.) chuck roast
• 1 teaspoon salt
• 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
• 1 Tablespoon mild olive oil, such as Pompeian Extra Virgin Smooth
• 8 large carrots
• 3 lbs. red potatoes
• 2 cups low or no sodium beef stock*
• 1 Tablespoon balsamic vinegar

Directions:
1.
• Season the roast all over with salt and pepper
• Heat a skillet over medium-high heat
• Add the olive oil. Let the oil get really hot
• Add the roast to the hot oil
• Cook on one side until very-browned, 4-5 minutes
• Flip it over and get the other side brown and crusty as well, another 4-5 minutes.
2.
• Peel the carrots and chop them into large chunks
• Halve any smaller potatoes and quarter larger ones.
3.
• Preheat oven to 300°F
• Transfer the roast to a roomy roasting pan.
4.
• Pour beef stock into the skillet that you used to sear the roast
• Heat over medium-high heat to a simmer
• Add 1 tablespoon of balsamic vinegar
• Stir
• Pour over the roast in the roasting pan
• Surround roast with potatoes
• Top the roast and potatoes with the carrots.
5.
• Put a lid on the roasting pan, or cover it tightly in heavy-duty foil
• Put it into the oven until the potatoes and carrots are soft and the meat is tender enough that you could pull it apart with your fingers, about 2 hours.
6.
• Remove the meat and potatoes from the liquid
• Optionally drizzle the meat with some balsamic vinegar (1 teaspoon or so) or serve it on the side as a dip
• If you’d like to serve the braising liquid with the meal, skim off the fat before doing so
7.
• Slice the meat and serve with the potatoes, carrots, balsamic vinegar and braising liquid (optional).

*You might need more or less stock depending on the size of your roast and the size of your roasting pan. What you ideally want is to have enough stock so that the roast is covered half way up

General Advice For a Great Steak

Temperature and Marinade
• The secret to great tasting steak is often how it’s handled before it ever reaches the pan. The steak should be brought out of the refrigerator, at least, an hour before cooking so that it can reach room temperature throughout. Obviously, never try to cook a frozen steak
• If the meat has been frozen, then it should be thawed in the refrigerator overnight or until it is completely thawed. Do not thaw steaks or any meat for that matter, in water or the microwave. Thawing in water may contaminate the meat or lead to bacterial growth. Thawing in a microwave or oven will cook the outside of the meat before the inside is thawed, ruining the steak
• This wait time is also an excellent opportunity to add marinades to the steak.
• While top sirloin steaks are usually considered grill steaks and are tender enough not to require a marinade, they can add great flavor for a truly above average meal. The choice of whether or not to marinade is often one of flavor and appearance. The marinade will probably change the look of the sear on the outside of the steak. A variety of marinades can be used depending on the desired flavor, and it’s not hard to make your own
• It is important to give the marinade long enough to penetrate into the meat without breaking down the outside of the steak or over tenderizing it. Just place the steak in a bag filled with the marinade, work it around a bit to get a nice coating and let it sit. The time it takes the meat to reach optimal room temperature is just long enough to impart some extra flavor to the meat, so it fits nicely with the rest of the process.

Paper Towel Prep
• Once the steak has reached room temperature throughout, pat it down with a paper towel to remove excess moisture. This helps with the sear
• If a marinade was used, the paper towel step is still important to ensure excessive amounts of the marinade are not left on the steak. Excessive marinade or pieces of the marinade ingredients may char on the outside of the steak, creating a bitter flavor.

Heat the Pan
• An often overlooked step is to have the frying pan properly heated before placing the meat on it. Heating the oil in the pan has several critical advantages. It ensures the meat has a proper sear and seal the moment it hits the pan. This locks the juices inside where they are supposed to be. It also prevents excess oil from seeping into the steak.
• Heat the pan with about a tablespoon of cooking oil or butter in it. The oil you use can vary, but it is important to choose something that can stand up to high heat without burning or making an off flavor. Coconut oil or ghee is usually the best choice. You will know the oil is ready when it begins emitting faint white smoke.

Salt Before Cooking
• There is a long-standing argument about whether steak should be salted before or after cooking. Although this case has been mostly settled by food scientists, it is still common to hear that salting can draw moisture and flavor out of the meat.
• It was found that the opposite is true. The salt firms the outside of the steak and prevents the loss of moisture and flavor, so remember that despite what you may hear always salt your steak before cooking.
• A pinch or two of salt on each side is ideal. Kosher salt is a nice choice because its flavor is milder, but any salt can be used. Just be careful not to oversalt the meat.

Why Use a Cast Iron Frying Pan?
The use of cast iron pans is universally recommended for stove top cooking. It has excellent heat retention properties, and it can be seasoned to produce a nearly non-stick surface. Here is a short list of reasons to use cast iron frying pans:
1.Even heat distribution- Cast iron creates an even, intense heat across the total pan surface. That helps seal in juices to keep the meat moist and flavorful
2 They are versatile: You can use a cast iron pan to deep fry or sauté or to bake in. It’s just as handy as a baking pan in the oven as it is a grilling pan on the stove top
3.Cost Saving:Cast iron pans are less expensive than steel or other metal pans. And one cast iron pan can do the jobs that other metal pans require a number of different pans to accomplish
4.Long lasting: Cast iron pans are durable and have a long lifespan. They are often passed down from generation to generation. And unlike other pans, old and worn cast iron pieces of can usually be refurbished with a good scrubbing
5. Non-stick: Once a cast iron pan is seasoned correctly, food won’t stick to it. It also does not give off toxic fumes that non-stick pans do
6. Easy to clean: A stiff brush and hot water will do the trick.

How to Season your Cast Iron Cookware
New cast-iron skillets needed to be seasoned properly to develop that non-stick surface. Here are the steps necessary to accomplish that:
1. Preheat the oven to 325°F
2. Use warm, soapy water to wash the skillet. Use a sponge or stiff brush to thoroughly clean. This is the only time you’ll want to use soap. Once the pan is seasoned, soap is never used when cleaning after use
3. Rinse and pat dry with paper towels
4. Rub the pan with a thin coating of flax seed oil a paper towel of soft rag
5. Place the pan in the preheated oven with the skillet upside down on the center rack
6. Place a baking pan below the under rack to catch drips
7. Bake at 325°F for sixty minutes
8. Turn off oven. Allow the pan to cool down completely to room temperature, usually about two hours, then remove the pan from the oven
9. For maximum results and to achieve a superior seasoned coating, repeat the process three or four more times or until the cast iron has a dark, semi-matte finish.

Restaurant Style Cooking Thick Steak on Stove Top
• For steaks that are extra thick, you might try using a style of cooking many upscale restaurants use called Sous-vide. In this form of cooking, the chef seals the steak in an airtight plastic bag, then places the bag in a bath of temperature-controlled hot water.
• Water kept at a temperature of between 131 to 140 °F will cook the meat to medium-rare finish but not beyond
• The purpose of Sous-vide is to cook the meat from the inside to ensure that the middle of the extra thick steak is properly cooked without having to char or overcook the outside layer
• Just before serving, the steak is removed from the plastic bag and placed on a hot cast iron skillet for a short time until you get that crisp, dark crust on the top and bottom. The inside remains a beautiful medium-rare pink.

How to Grill a T-Bone Steak

Grilling
Once you have your perfect T-bone, prep doesn’t need to go any further than salt and pepper
1. Salting should be done at least 40 minutes prior to grilling, with a heavy layer of kosher salt—remember that you’re seasoning for a thick, meaty steak
2. Basically, the salt needs time to first draw moisture out of the steak, and then break down the muscle fibers, so that the now-concentrated, flavorful liquid that was drawn out can be reabsorbed.
3. Right before the steak is ready to hit the grill, it can be given a layer of freshly ground pepper, to taste
4. Some folks prefer adding pepper at the end, claiming that it can taste burnt or bitter if added before cooking.

Method 1: The Sear and Roast
1. The best way to cook a massive T-bone is to sear it over high, direct heat, then move it to indirect heat to finish cooking. This is certainly the method you’ll most commonly come across.
2. To develop a great sear on an uncooked steak, you want to go for the highest heat you can get
3. With charcoal, this is the point when a whole chimney full of coals has just finished lighting and is covered in gray ash. Over this heat, the steak seared beautifully, especially if its flipped every 30 seconds or so to cook it evenly and maximize that crust

Method 2: The Reverse Sear
1. As the name implies, this method swaps the roasting and searing, so the steak is first brought up over indirect heat to a temperature about 5°F below your final desired doneness
2. Then it is seared over direct heat. This usually results in a steak that’s more evenly red throughout. It’s also a more effective way to sear, since the steak’s exterior will have less moisture to burn away after it’s been cooking for a bit

Directions:
Step #1
• At least 45 minutes before cooking, season steaks generously with salt and pepper on all sides, including edges
• Set steaks on a wire rack set over a rimmed baking sheet and refrigerate, uncovered, until ready to coo
• Alternatively, season steaks immediately before placing on hot grill.
Step #2
• Light 1 chimney full of charcoal. When all charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and spread coals evenly over half of coal grate
• Alternatively, set half the burners of a gas grill to high heat
• Set cooking grate in place, cover grill, and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil grilling grate.
Step #3
• Arrange steaks on cooler side of grill with tenderloins (the smaller medallions of meat) positioned farthest from the coals. Cover and set top and bottom vents to half-closed position
• Cook steaks, turning once (but always keeping tenderloin farthest from the coals), until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the coolest part of the strip (the larger section of meat) registers 115°F/46°C and the tenderloin registers 110°F/43°C for medium-rare, about 15 minutes. Cooking times can vary drastically depending on the heat of the grill, so begin checking after 10 minutes.
Step #5
• If coals are not blazing-hot at this point, add more to the fire and allow fire to become hot again
• Transfer steaks directly over coals and cook, turning, until very well seared on both sides
• Using tongs, hold steaks on their edges to sear the sides as well.
Step #6
Let rest 10 minutes, then serve.

Steps for Cooking Perfect Round Steak

Step #1
• Remove your steak from the refrigerator, place it on the countertop, and allow it to come to room temperature for at least 30 minutes. This will ensure your steak cooks more evenly. If you cook your steak straight from the refrigerator, it may be perfectly cooked on the outside but underdone on the inside

Step #2
• Use a paper towel to pat the steak dry on both sides. Removing the moisture ensures your steak will sear rather than steam. It is important your steak is as dry as possible and that your pan does not contain any water

Step #3
• Salt your steak immediately before cooking with kosher salt
• Use your fingers to pat a thin layer of salt on both sides. This will result in a nice crust on your finished steak
• Conversely, you could salt your steak anywhere from a few days to 40 minutes before cooking. The salt will draw out the natural juices in the meat and create a sort of brine which will help soften and break down the tough tissues in the round steak.

Step #4
• Place your skillet on the stove top, add your cooking oil, and turn your stovetop to high heat. You will know the oil is ready when it begins to smoke
• You want to use an oil with a high smoke point

Step #5
• Once your skillet is hot enough, add your Steak. You should hear it begin to sear. A medium rare steak will take an average of around 6 minutes although this will vary depending on the thickness and size of your cut
• You can sear the steak three minutes on one side, flip it with your tongs, and sear it three minutes on the other side. This method involves the least amount of work and will result in a nicely cooked steak
• If you don’t mind standing over the stovetop, you can flip the steak more often, as soon as every 15 seconds. This results in a more even color on both sides and cooks the steak faster since you are cooking it from both sides relatively simultaneously

Step #6
• If you desire, you can baste the steak. This involves just spooning the hot cooking liquid over the meat. If you want to add butter, add it to the pan halfway through your cooking time to ensure it does not burn
• Allow it to melt and then baste your steak with it. Baste each time you flip. This will add flavor, decrease cooking time, and help achieve a more even and brown crust

Step #7
• If you wish to add more flavor to your steak, add shallots, garlic, rosemary, or thyme to the pan after the butter has melted. These will infuse the cooking fat with their flavor which you then baste over the meat. The result is a wonderfully moist and flavorful steak

Step #8
• The best way to ensure your round steak is cooked to perfection is to use a meat thermometer. Begin checking the temperature of your meat around 4 minutes
• Just insert the probe into the meat. Be sure not to push it all the way through and hit the pan
• For a medium rare steak, remove the meat from the pan when the internal temperature measures around 130 degrees Fahrenheit. The meat will continue to rise in temperature about 5 degrees while it rests

Step #9
• Place your steak on a cutting board, add freshly ground pepper to taste, and allow it to rest for about 10 minutes. This allows the juices to redistribute throughout the meat, resulting in a steak that is moist and juicy throughout

Step #10
• When ready to serve, slice the steak thinly across the grain, or perpendicular to the muscle fibers. Pieces should be no more than ½ inch thick. This breaks up the tough muscle fibers in the round steak and results in a perfect, tender bite.

Pan Fried Sirloin Steak

• Gently place the steak in the center of the pan and welcome the loud sizzle. It is most important to be patient and precise with this step. Do not fuss over the steak. It should be turned as little as possible, preferably only once
• The exact cooking times vary depending on the desired level of doneness. The traditional medium-rare level can be achieved with about three minutes of cooking on each side. Decrease by about a minute each side for rare and increase a minute or two on each side for medium and well
• A meat thermometer is your best friend when cooking a steak. You want to avoid cutting into the steak to check for doneness because this ruins the appearance and release all the juices and flavor into the pan
• Since cooking time can vary due to so many factors, tracking temperature instead of time is always the best approach. An internal temperature of 130-135 degrees Fahrenheit is optimal for medium-rare. Be sure to jab the thermometer as close to the middle of the steak as possible for the best reading.

Resting
• Resting a steak allows the juices, which have gone wild during cooking, to redistribute throughout the meat and settle. If the steak is cut into before this happens, the juices will flow out of the steak, and you will be left with a dry and flavorless hun
• The steak should be placed under a tent-shaped piece of aluminum foil for about five minutes to rest. The foil is important to prevent the outside of the steak from cooling off too much
• After resting, plate the steak and sprinkle with coarse ground pepper and any additional garnish.

How Do You Cook a T-Bone Steak on the Stove Top?

• Gently place the steak in the center of the pan and welcome the loud sizzle. It is most important to be patient and precise with this step. Do not fuss over the steak. It should be turned as little as possible, preferably only once
• The exact cooking times vary depending on the desired level of doneness. The traditional medium-rare level can be achieved with about three minutes of cooking on each side. Decrease by about a minute each side for rare and increase a minute or two on each side for medium and well
• A meat thermometer is your best friend when cooking a steak. You want to avoid cutting into the steak to check for doneness because this ruins the appearance and release all the juices and flavor into the pan
• Since cooking time can vary due to so many factors, tracking temperature instead of time is always the best approach. An internal temperature of 130-135 degrees Fahrenheit is optimal for medium-rare. Be sure to jab the thermometer as close to the middle of the steak as possible for the best reading.

Resting
• Resting a steak allows the juices, which have gone wild during cooking, to redistribute throughout the meat and settle. If the steak is cut into before this happens, the juices will flow out of the steak, and you will be left with a dry and flavorless hun
• The steak should be placed under a tent-shaped piece of aluminum foil for about five minutes to rest. The foil is important to prevent the outside of the steak from cooling off too much
• After resting, plate the steak and sprinkle with coarse ground pepper and any additional garnish.

RibEye Steak

Bring the Steak to Room Temperature
• First, bring the steak to room temperature. This process may take from 40 minutes to an hour depending on the ribeye’s size
• This first step is crucial to maintaining a uniform heating surface within your skillet. It also reduces your overall cooking time and ensures that a ribeye’s core cooks at the proper temperature; this is especially important when cooking meat within rare ranges. The tools needed to cook a ribeye in a skillet include the following:
• Thick-walled heavy 10-12 inch skillet (forged aluminum is a great non-stick alternative)
• Sturdy medium/large tongs for flipping the steak
• Instant meat thermometer
• Paper towels

Remove Excess Moisture From Your Ribeye
• Remove excess moisture from your ribeye by patting each side of the meat’s surface with a paper towel just before cooking. This step will help you achieve a ribeye steak that has a perfectly seared, brown texture.

Heat Up the Skillet
• Season both sides of your steak with Kosher salt while waiting for the skillet to heat up. Kosher salt has a low-density, less sharp flavor per pinch than regular table salt which allows you the ability to season your steak more if need be
• For maximum flavor here, add pepper after you’ve almost fully cooked the ribeye
• It’s essential for the skillet to reach a very high heat to ensure that the ribeye steak will sear properly
• Coat the skillet with a teaspoon of either ghee or coconut oil and wait for it to evaporate into white smoke. This is an indicator that the skillet is now hot enough
• Allow the skillet to heat for another 10 seconds before quickly placing the meat inside the center of the skillet. Remember, heating a skillet to the proper searing temperature can take up to 10 minutes
• When cooking multiple steaks, only place an amount that can comfortably fit side by side (with room in between) inside the skillet; this will ensure that they will sear properly and form a nice crust.

The Perfect Medium-Rare Ribeye
• You’ll hear a fast sizzle as the remaining moisture on the meat’s surface is cooked away once it is placed in the skillet
• If you prefer to cook your ribeye medium rare, leave the meat undisturbed for three minutes on each side. Six minutes is typically the time needed to achieve a medium rare. However, this cooking time may vary depending on the thickness and surface temperature of the skillet plus the type of stove you’ll be using to cook the meat
• Always use tongs to handle and turn a steak. Using a fork will puncture the steak and let out its natural juices
• The less a steak is poked, the better. Use a meat thermometer about 30 seconds before finishing cooking the second side, with a range for medium-rare around 55-57C / 130-135F. Add an extra 30-60 seconds per side if needed.

Allow the Ribeye to Rest
• The resting stage helps seal up the ribeye’s flavors
• Let your ribeye sit for 5 minutes under a strip of foil after you’ve peppered it
• Cut the steak perpendicular to its muscle fibers to stop the flavor from escaping from the steak too early
• Add a tasteful garnish such as sprigs of rosemary and serve. You can also add steak sauce or any condiment that suits your taste.

Recipes

Steak Tips with Mushroom Sauce
• 2 1/2 pounds sirloin tips, uncut
• 1/2 (750 milliliter) bottle Burgundy wine
• 2 (14.5 ounce) cans beef broth
• 4 portobello mushroom caps, sliced
• 1/4 cup butter
• 1 clove garlic, chopped
• 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
• 1/4 teaspoon salt, or to taste
• 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper, or to taste
• 1 shallot, finely chopped
• 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

Directions:
• Preheat an outdoor grill for medium-high heat. Melt butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat
• Sautee the shallot until transparent, then add mushrooms, and cook, covered, until darkened, about 5 minutes.
• Remove mushrooms from pan, and set aside
• Deglaze the pan with one can of beef broth, and burgundy wine. Increase heat, and bring to a boil. Allow the mixture to boil until it has reduced by 1/3.
• Grill the sirloin tips to desired doneness. Season with salt and pepper if desired. Remove to a plate, and set aside.
• When the sauce is reduced, stir in the other can of beef broth, and garlic. Return to a boil, and continue to cook for another 5 to 10 minutes
• Sauce will be thin like au jus. Whisk in flour, and cook until the sauce is the desired thickness. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Stir in the mushrooms. Serve tips with mushroom sauce spooned over.

Sirloin Steak with Garlic Butter
• 1/2 cup butter
• 2 teaspoons garlic powder
• 4 cloves garlic, minced
• 4 pounds beef top sirloin steaks
• salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
1. Preheat an outdoor grill for high heat.
2. In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium-low heat with garlic powder and minced garlic. Set aside.
3. Sprinkle both sides of each steak with salt and pepper.
4. Grill steaks 4 to 5 minutes per side, or to desired doneness. When done, transfer to warmed plates. Brush tops liberally with garlic butter, and allow to rest for 2 to 3 minutes before serving.


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